‘They’re doing all of this to scare people’. How Russian security officials searched Alexey Navalny’s Anti-Corruption Foundation, froze its assets, and fumbled numbers in the case against it

Investigators have used a criminal money laundering case against Alexey Navalny’s Anti-Corruption Foundation (FBK), one of Russia’s leading civic institutions, to freeze several bank accounts related to the group. FBK Press Secretary Kira Yarmysh announced on August 8 that the Foundation’s general account, the operational account for Navalny’s regional campaign offices, and a number of FBK staff members’ personal accounts had all been frozen. Those staff members were the same individuals the investigative outlet Proekt had previously reported state officials are targeting in the money laundering case. They include Navalny campaign chief Leonid Volkov, former FBK director Roman Rubanov, accountant Anna Chekhovich, sociological service head Anna Biryukova, legal department chief Vyacheslav Gimadi, and attorneys Alexander Pomazuyev and Evgeny Zamyatin.

Russian regulators open antitrust investigation against Apple following Kaspersky Lab complaint

Russia’s Federal Anti-Monopoly Service (FAS) has begun investigating Apple after receiving a complaint from the Russian antivirus software company Kaspersky Lab. Kaspersky alleged that Apple arbitrarily curtailed the functions available on its devices for the Kaspersky Safe Kids parental control application while releasing similar functions in its own product, Screen Time. The FAS will consider the case on September 13.

Prosecutors threatened to take away his nephew, and now activist Sergey Fomin faces even steeper felony ‘rioting’ charges

Hours after activist Sergey Fomin turned himself over to police, Moscow investigators raised the charges against him from “participating in mass rioting” to “organizing mass rioting.” Officials now say he was responsible for “directing the actions of other participants.” Police previously issued a warrant for Fomin’s arrest in connection with his supposed participation in alleged riots on July 27 at an unpermitted opposition protest. He now faces a maximum prison sentence of 15 years, instead of eight years.

A seven-point crackdown. To suppress opposition protests, Moscow has unleashed police, repo men, military recruiters, investigators, courts, prosecutors, and university administrators

Following Moscow’s demonstration on July 27 in support of free elections, the website OVD-Info reported more than 25 attacks on protesters. According to the website Baza, law enforcement injured 77 people, including designer Konstantin Konovalov, who developed the city’s ubiquitous subway logo. He was arrested while jogging, roughly two hours before the demonstration even started. National Guard troops were so rough that they broke one of his legs, while pinning him to the ground. The city then charged him with the misdemeanor offense of violating Russia’s laws on public assemblies. A week later, on August 3, after another unpermitted protest, at least 18 demonstrators ended up in the hospital because of injuries sustained during their arrests.

Russia’s new resistance. ‘Meduza’ analyzes the rise of a new wave of protest movements

For three weeks in a row, Moscow residents have taken to the streets to demand fair elections for their City Duma. The Russian capital’s government has done its best to ban the protests, and police have dispersed them as violently as ever, but that hasn’t stopped thousands of people from taking part even when the marches aren’t protected by a permit. The Moscow City Duma election protests were preceded by a number of others: In early June, pickets and marches put pressure on Moscow officials to free Ivan Golunov, a Meduza correspondent who was falsely accused of drug distribution. In mid-May, Yekaterinburg residents put up a fierce fight against plans to build a new cathedral in one of the city’s few green areas. All in all, it’s clear that Russia’s protest movements have reached a new stage of development in the last two or three years. Meduza analyst Dmitry Kartsev set out to explain, point-by-point, what about those movements has changed.

Russia’s new ‘anti-terrorism’ restrictions on telecoms lead to skyrocketing profits for interception-technology companies

Last year, new “anti-terrorism” regulations authored by State Duma deputy Irina Yarovaya entered force in Russia. Since July 1, 2018, communications providers have been required to store copies of the last six months of all clients’ telephone conversations, text messages, and electronic correspondence. Additionally, since October 1, Russian telecoms have had to store the past 30 days of clients’ Internet traffic history.

Russia’s new resistance. ‘Meduza’ analyzes the rise of a new wave of protest movements

For three weeks in a row, Moscow residents have taken to the streets to demand fair elections for their City Duma. The Russian capital’s government has done its best to ban the protests, and police have dispersed them as violently as ever, but that hasn’t stopped thousands of people from taking part even when the marches aren’t protected by a permit. The Moscow City Duma election protests were preceded by a number of others: In early June, pickets and marches put pressure on Moscow officials to free Ivan Golunov, a Meduza correspondent who was falsely accused of drug distribution. In mid-May, Yekaterinburg residents put up a fierce fight against plans to build a new cathedral in one of the city’s few green areas. All in all, it’s clear that Russia’s protest movements have reached a new stage of development in the last two or three years. Meduza analyst Dmitry Kartsev set out to explain, point-by-point, what about those movements has changed.