After 50 days in jail, Navalny is summoned for questioning in yet another criminal case

Almost immediately after going free from 50 days in jail, anti-corruption activist and opposition politician Alexey Navalny says he was summoned by police on October 15 to be interrogated for two-year-old defamation charges brought by Interior Ministry investigator Pavel Karpov, who accuses Navalny of sharing hyperlinks to the documentary film “Russian Untouchables,” which ties Karpov to the torture and murder of Hermitage Capital lawyer Sergey Magnitsky.

The Real Russia. Today. Yevkurov has some explaining to do, Kashin says RIP to S&P, and the GRU functions as a social ladder for Russia’s rural poor

Ingush leader Yunus-bek Yevkurov is trying to explain why he signed an unpopular border agreement with Chechnya last month. In comments to the magazine RBC, Yevkurov said the motivation to revisit the Ingush-Chechen boundary was “spontaneously” prompted by public backlash to excavation work in the Ingush village of Arshty by the Chechen road-work company “Chechenavtodor.” When the Chechen bulldozer appeared on Ingush territory, Yevkurov says, locals became alarmed that Chechen officials were trying to seize their land.

Ingush leader says his controversial border agreement with Chechnya was signed ‘spontaneously’

Ingush leader Yunus-bek Yevkurov is trying to explain why he signed an unpopular border agreement with Chechnya last month. In comments to the magazine RBC, Yevkurov said the motivation to revisit the Ingush-Chechen boundary was “spontaneously” prompted by public backlash to excavation work in the Ingush village of Arshty by the Chechen road-work company “Chechenavtodor.” When the Chechen bulldozer appeared on Ingush territory, Yevkurov says, locals became alarmed that Chechen officials were trying to seize their land.

Russian city councilman’s wife who twerked in front of ambulances on the Moscow Beltway is fined 300 bucks

Some memories, like delaying multiple ambulances on the Moscow Beltway because you’re twerking in the road with your friends in an amateur music video, are priceless. But even an invaluable stunt like that can cost you — just ask 29-year-old Oksana Yakovleva, aka the performer “Yaxana,” who was fined 20,000 rubles (about $300) on October 12 for shaking her posterior alongside her pals on a busy highway. An entertaining spectacle in its own right, Yakovleva’s dance made headlines in Russia this week because she’s also the wife of a city councilman outside the capital. Her husband, Alexey Yakovlev, told a local television station that he would “have words” with her about the disruptive twerking.

The Real Russia. Today. Russia’s plans in Libya, telecom shenanigans in Ingushetia, and the former Kaspersky Lab expert now on trial for treason suffers a pulmonary embolism in jail

Russian and Western media outlets say Moscow has been deploying troops to Libya for the past several months, reportedly to bolster one group in the country’s civil war. Russia is apparently filling a vacuum: the U.S. has effectively abandoned its efforts to intervene in the situation, and European nations are more concerned with stemming the flow of immigrants from Africa than resolving the conflict. Meduza takes a look at who’s fighting whom in Libya, and what Russia’s interests are in this messy conflict. Here are the questions addressed in the text:

Ingush police open criminal cases against two activists, as mobile Internet service fails across the republic and protests continue

Protests are still happening in Ingushetia, where police just opened criminal cases against two prominent activists: General Civic Forum chairman Musa Malsagov and a local clan council leader named Malsag Uzhakhov. According to Barakh Chemurziev, the head of the “Support Ingushetia” movement, the two activists are charged with insulting the state authorities, and police already have warrants to search their homes.

Russia is suspected of deploying troops to Libya, but what’s Moscow’s play in this muddy conflict?

Russian and Western media outlets say Moscow has been deploying troops to Libya for the past several months, reportedly to bolster one group in the country’s civil war. Russia is apparently filling a vacuum: the U.S. has effectively abandoned its efforts to intervene in the situation, and European nations are more concerned with stemming the flow of immigrants from Africa than resolving the conflict. Meduza takes a look at who’s fighting whom in Libya, and what Russia’s interests are in this messy conflict.