The Real Russia. Today. Navalny gets another 20 days in jail, United Russia blows gubernatorial races, and the GRU has some funny passport policies

Just as he was leaving jail after serving 30 days for staging an unpermitted protest in January, Alexey Navalny was detained again and dragged to another courtroom on September 24, to face charges for promoting a rally on September 9 against pension reform that lead to injury or property damage (a violation of Administrative Code 20.2). Hours later, he was convicted and sentenced to 20 more days in jail.

Alexey Navalny gets another 20 days behind bars (immediately after serving 30 days in jail), and it could pave the way to new felony charges

Just as he was leaving jail after serving 30 days for staging an unpermitted protest in January, Alexey Navalny was detained again and dragged to another courtroom on September 24, to face charges for promoting a rally on September 9 against pension reform that lead to injury or property damage (a violation of Administrative Code 20.2). Hours later, he was convicted and sentenced to 20 more days in jail.

Russia’s ruling political party blows another two gubernatorial runoff elections, prompting a wave of new speculation about what it all means

Over the weekend, LDPR candidates routed the incumbent governors in two runoff elections. In Vladimir, Governor Svetlana Orlova lost to Vladimir Sipyagin, 37.46 percent to 57.03 percent, and in Khabarovsk, acting Governor Vyacheslav Shport lost to Sergey Furgal by a whopping 27.97 percent to 69.57 percent. The newsletter The Bell argues that LDPR’s candidates won these races in spite of themselves, riding the protest vote. Sipyagin, for example, didn’t even campaign in the second route, political expert Alexander Pozhalov told Vedomosti. Before winning, Sergey Furgal even said he’d accept a role in Shport’s government (though he now denies this).

Amid major divorce dispute, ‘Moskovsky Komsomolets’ chief editor’s ex-wife is detained by police

On Monday, Moscow police detained Evgeniya Efimova, the ex-wife of Pavel Gusev, the owner and long-time chief editor of the newspaper Moskovsky Komsomolets. Efimova is reportedly being charged with “organized swindling” either on a large scale or resulting in the deprivation of someone’s housing. No further details are known about the case, but “Kolchuga” arms wholesaler owner Mikhail Khubutiya told the magazine RBC that Efimova has reached out to him for help, claiming that her ex-husband is trying to “pressure her,” apparently into dropping her civil suit against Gusev for a division of their property.

‘Yeah it’s the GRU HQ — so what?’. Funny passport numbers link a whole web of suspected Russian intelligence operatives

On September 20, the open-source investigative team Bellingcat and the news website The Insider published the second part of their report on Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, the suspected Russian intelligence officers accused by Great Britain of trying to assassinate former double agent Sergey Skripal with a nerve agent in Salisbury. Both Petrov and Boshirov say they were in Salisbury at the time of the poisoning merely as tourists. According to data released by Bellingcat and The Insider, the two men’s passport numbers differ only slightly from each other and from other suspected GRU agents, suggesting that the documents were issued in a special series. Now a news outlet in St. Petersburg has published evidence that the passport numbers tie the Salisbury suspects to a wider web of suspected GRU agents.

Russia’s elderly live rough lives, and the state offers almost no help, but officials say everything is about to change

Responding to widespread criticism of the government’s plan to raise the retirement age, Russia’s state-controlled media has been busy telling readers how important it is to live vigorously into old age to avoid becoming a “grumbling old fogey.” “For many people, a pension is an excuse to stop being active, to become frail, and not to want anything, or to want to do things but not to do them, because their finances or health don’t allow it,” explains one op-ed published by the Rossiya Segodnya news agency. The message to readers is clearly that the reason for older people’s unhappiness is that they retired too early. In reality, Russia is a particularly hard place to grow old. According to the 2015 Global AgeWatch Index, compiled by the NGO HelpAge International, Russia’s “report card” ranked it 65th out of 96 countries. When judged on life expectancy and mental well-being, Russia falls to 86th place. Meduza’s medical news editor Darya Sarkisyan takes a closer look at Russia’s geriatric care infrastructure and how officials have promised to change it.

The Real Russia. Today. More U.S. sanctions, 20 years of treason and espionage convictions, and another GRU bombshell

If you’re reading this, you presumably subscribe to Meduza’s daily newsletter, which we describe as “the last 24 hours of news broken down into 60 seconds of reading.” In reality, however, our newsletters often sacrifice headline news summaries for closer looks at stories with special significance. If you read the newsletter, you also know that some of our missives can take a spell longer than 60 seconds to peruse. Sometimes, the newsletter focuses on political events, sometimes cultural stories, and other times you’ll learn about financial happenings. With all this going on, we’d like to hear what you like best and dislike most about our current daily newsletters. This survey is our opportunity to learn more about what you want, and your chance to let us know.